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Grayling River Hot Springs

 

59.617769,-125.555878

It is located roughly 50 kilometers upstream (22.98 kilometers in a straight line) of the Grayling River’s confluence with the Liard River.

The Grayling River Hot Springs ecosection is represented by the Grayling River Hot Springs, which features a nationally significant thermal and mineral spring complex. Based on geological and ecological characteristics, the ecological reserve is ranked as one of the best hot springs in Canada.

The hot springs are found in a sequence of differing temperatures along both sides of a narrow canyon on the Grayling River and a flat area further downstream.

On one of the canyon points, an impressive tufa formation (calcium deposits precipitated by hot spring water) occurs above a rare cave inhabited by bats.

 

Lower hot springs discharge into a complex network of rivers and pools within the flood channels on both banks of the Grayling. The tufa terrace and steep 20-meter-high cliff on the river’s edge are notable features. The temperatures in the hot springs are the highest in the Liard area. This far north, karst topography is unusual.

Following a major burn in 1971, the terraces around the Grayling River Hot Springs are in the early stages of deciduous succession, though minor residual clusters of mature white spruce remain on north-facing slopes and on the river’s gravel bars.

Thermally-induced gravel bars and river banks host one of the most diverse plant communities in the Liard region, which includes a wide variety of warm water plant species. Local plant occurrences commonly associated with hot springs include yellow monkey-flower, Philadelphia fleabane, Pennsylvania pellitory, and the most northern occurrence of western witchgrass. Prairie wedgegrass and satin grass are two provincially rare plants synonymous with hot springs.

 Of the physical diversity of hot spring and non-hot spring environments present here, an extraordinarily large number of vascular plant species have evolved.

A large nursery colony of Little Brown Myotis can be found in the ecological reserve. It also has a lot of moose and other ungulate habitats, grizzly bear habitats, and arctic grayling and bull trout in the lakes.

59.617769,-125.555878

Located roughly 50 kilometres upstream (22.98 kilometres in a straight line) of the Grayling River’s confluence with the Liard River.
The Grayling River Hot Springs ecosection is represented by the Grayling River Hot Springs, which features a nationally significant thermal and mineral spring complex. Based on geological and ecological characteristics, the ecological reserve is ranked as one of the best hot springs in Canada.
The hot springs are found in a sequence of differing temperatures along both sides of a narrow canyon on the Grayling River and a flat area further downstream.

On one of the canyon points, an impressive tufa formation (calcium deposits precipitated by hot spring water) occurs above a rare cave inhabited by bats.
Lower hot springs discharge into a complex network of rivers and pools within the flood channels on both banks of the Grayling. The tufa terrace and steep 20-meter-high cliff on the river’s edge are notable features. The temperatures in the hot springs are the highest in the Liard area. This far north, karst topography is unusual.

Following a major burn in 1971, the terraces around the Grayling River Hot Springs are in the early stages of deciduous succession, though minor residual clusters of mature white spruce remain on north-facing slopes and on the river’s gravel bars.
Thermally-induced gravel bars and river banks host one of the most diverse plant communities in the Liard region, which includes a wide variety of warm water plant species. Local plant occurrences commonly associated with hot springs include yellow monkey-flower, Philadelphia fleabane, Pennsylvania pellitory, and the most northern occurrence of western witchgrass. Prairie wedgegrass and satin grass are two provincially rare plants synonymous with hot springs.
 of the physical diversity of hot spring and non-hot spring environments present here, an extraordinarily large number of vascular plant species have evolved.
A large nursery colony of Little Brown Myotis can be found in the ecological reserve. It also has a lot of moose and other ungulate habitat, grizzly bear habitat, and arctic grayling and bull trout in the lakes.

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